Parent Partnership Service

Early Years

Early Years Support

What is ALN?

The term Additional Learning Needs (ALN) is replacing Special Educational Needs (SEN).

The term ‘additional learning needs’ has a legal definition and refers to children and young people with learning, physical or sensory needs that make it harder to learn than most children of the same age.

A learner has ALN if he or she has a learning difficulty or disability which calls for additional learning provision (ALP).

A child under compulsory school age has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she is likely to (or would be likely to if no ALP were made) have significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of their peers when they reach compulsory school age. 

It is possible for a child or young person to have a learning difficulty or disability that does not call for ALP. In these instances such a child or young people would not be considered to have ALN. Further it is important to note that not all learning difficulties or disabilities that arise from a medical condition will call for additional learning provision

There will be a new ALN Code setting out the detail of the new legal framework. This will provide detailed guidance for professionals who work with children and young people with ALN. The Code must be accessible to families and accurately reflect what they expect of professionals who work with their children. It should be clear and contain mandatory requirements and be easily enforceable.

How will my child be supported in an Early Years setting?

Your child’s key worker will be able to direct you to the Early Years Additional Learning Needs Lead Officer (EY ALNLO) who can tell you what support is currently in place for your child and discuss with you what additional support may be available for your child.

If a child has a health professional working with them e.g. Speech and language therapist, the professional will continue to work with the child and support the setting with targets and strategies.

A transition meeting takes place the term before a child starts a new school. A transition meeting is held with both the school and early years setting in attendance. A transition meeting is held to ensure that there is discussion about how your child will be supported, and to pass on any key information that will help the new school support your child. The meeting will also be attended by any professionals supporting your child.

Frequently asked questions

Who can I talk to if I have concerns about my child?

If you think your child may have additional learning needs, you can talk to your child’s key worker or playgroup leader at your child’s pre-school or nursery. You can also raise your concerns with your GP or Health Visitor.

How will my child be supported in an Early Years setting?

Your child’s key worker will be able to direct you to the pre-schools ALNCO who can tell you what support is currently in place for your child and discuss with you what additional support may be available for your child.

What is an ALNCO?

Every pre-school setting will have a designated has Additional Learning Needs Coordinator, known as an ALNCO. They make sure children with additional needs get the support they need.     

The ALNCO will: 

  • Coordinate the support children need day to day
  • Discuss individual targets with the parents. 

If my child has a health professional working with them will they continue to support my child is a setting?

If a child has a health professional working with them e.g. Speech and language therapist, the professional will continue to work with the child and support the setting with targets and strategies. 

What is a transition meeting?

A transition meeting takes place the term before a child starts a new school. A transition meeting is held with both the school and early years setting in attendance. A transition meeting is held to ensure that there is discussion about how your child will be supported, and to pass on any key information that will help the new school support your child. The meeting will also be attended by any professionals supporting your child.

What is the Early Years panel?

In all cases where a child in an early years setting is considered to have Additional Learning Needs which may require support in addition to that already being provided by the setting, the setting can make a referral to the local authority early years panel.

The Early Years multi agency panel will consider the evidence submitted by the setting in respect of the child’s Additional Learning needs, the intervention and support to which the child will already have had access, the level of progress which the child may or may not have made and, taking into account the parents/carers views and the views of the child where possible, will determine the appropriate course of action necessary to meet the child’s needs.

What is a One page profile?

A One Page Profile captures all the important information about a child on a single sheet of paper under three simple headings:

  • what people admire about me
  • what’s important to me
  • how best to support me

One-page profiles are developed and revised with the active involvement of the child or young person to ensure that their voice is heard.

They provide a positive rounded picture of their interests and outline what is important both to and for the child or young person.

What is PCP?

Person centred approaches should be at the heart of everything thing we do with children and young people with Additional Learning Needs and disabilities. It can help them to become more independent and to achieve their personal goals.

A Person centred plan is all about, listening to a child’s views and wishes, helping a child to think about what is important to them and for them.  Thinking about what is working and not working, and getting the best from everyone who knows the child. For example, parents, the Early Years setting and other professionals.

It is an opportunity to bring together everyone who supports the child and celebrate their achievements as well as discussing any concerns that they may have about the future. 

Can my child stay at Nursery even if they attend a school?

If you feel that your child is not ready to start school, you may choose for your child to continue at a 3 Year funded setting.

Pembrokeshire County Council agrees to provide the funding received from Welsh Government to offer all eligible children a minimum of 10 hours funded part-time education in an approved setting during the school term. Parents can choose to take up the child’s entitlement either in a maintained or a non-maintained setting.

Although it is not statutory for your child to attend Foundation Phase Nursery prior to gaining full time place in school, this is a very important phase in your child’s life as it lays the building blocks for their future learning and is part of the current and future curriculum. Foundation Phase Nursery (also referred to as FPN) is a general term used to describe the time your child spends in the Foundation Phase during the ages of three and four.

For further information: The Childcare Offer Wales

What support is out there for me as a parent?

Parent Partnership team offer a range of preventative early intervention services for families, including the statutory Parent Partnership service. The team aim to have a close working relationship with all professionals and settings in the LA. They cover the 0-25 years age range. Inclusion Support workers offer in each region half termly Parent Network Groups to facilitate peer to peer support and information sharing. They also deliver workshops including Moving Forward’ for post diagnosis support, and workshop themes such as Anxiety, SpLD and Sensory.

What support can I get at a setting?

An extensive training programme is available for all settings and childminders. This allows childcare providers to upskill and continue their professional development. Early Years settings can also make a referral to the Early Years panel for further support from an advisory teacher or request resources. A TAPPAS 2 (Team around the parent. pupil and setting) model is also held termly where settings are able to discuss children anonymously. TAPPAS provides a forum for Early Years non-maintained settings and professionals to share good practice, areas of concern and to simultaneously offer support to each other.

 

 

 

 

ID: 7862, revised 06/10/2021